1. Remember to boycott Jelly Belly candy corn again this Halloween.

    cinderpelt:

    Last year, the CEO of Jelly Belly donated money to an organisation that was fighting to stop transgender students from gaining equal access to gender-segregated facilities. (source)

    Please do not support Jelly Belly if you consider yourself an ally of transgender people. Buy an alternative brand of candy corn instead.

    Keeping in mind that Jelly Belly candy corn is the most popular vegetarian brand of candy corn, here are alternatives for vegetarians/vegans who want candy corn this season:

    • This is a link to buy (homemade) vegan candy corn on etsy. You can choose from multiple colours and flavours. It costs $15 for a 32 oz container of candy corn. 
    • Here are a few recipes so that you can make your own vegan/vegetarian candy corn. 1 2 3 4
  2. sexmind:

    MCALC the first Gender Neutral Menstruation Calculator.

    Mcalc started off as an idea to create a menstruation calculator app that could be used by anyone regardless of their gender, this way our app keeps the trans* and genderqueer community in mind so they can enjoy the features without being constantly misgendered (as with other apps).

    Our new app is still in BETA so we appreciate any feedback you can give us at info.sexmind@gmail.com, we try to solve as many bugs as possible in as little time as we can so please, let us know if anything is not working properly.

    What is Mcalc?

    Mcalc is a new menstruation calculator app, it tracks your period and keeps you updated on your current status and any upcoming important events of your menstrual cycle

    How does it work?

    Simple! just provide the app with some basic information about you and your cycle, Mcalc will calculate the rest, taking your personal context into consideration. Afterwards you can set alarms and even log relevant events.

    What features does it have?

    • Neutrality Guaranteed: We understand that sex and gender identity are not the same, because of this, we designed our app so it can be used by almost everyone. Mcalc is 100% gender neutral and it won’t assume anything from you while using it.
    • Notifications: Mcalc will keep you updated on the important dates of your menstrual cycle, it’s built in alarm system will allow you to set notifications you care about.
    • Adaptation: We all have different needs, and Mcalc can suit them accordingly, it will only display the information relevant to your purposes and won’t nag you with irrelevant data. Using Mcalc on “sex mode” will help you reduce your risks of getting pregnant when having sex for fun, while setting it on “baby mode” will help you increase your chances of getting pregnant when planning one.
    • Tracking: Mcalc lets you keep a log of your activity for later reference, it’s as simple as tapping a date in our calendar and tick the events that happened that day to save them for further reference.
    • Information: Discover new things about menstrual cycles by using Mcalc’s informative pages.

    You can learn more about mcalc by visiting our website:

    http://sexmind.com/mcalc-en/index.html

    Or you can go to the app store and download it here:

    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.Sexmind.Calculator

    GET MCALC TODAY!

    QR-code-android

    ******************VERY IMPORTANT EDIT***********************

    Due to the amount of feedback and notes we have had we want to make a few announcements:

    Features that we will include in the next version or upcoming updates:

    • BUG FIXES: We will try to support more android versions as well as fixing the current bugs on the supported ones (such as being unable to set a weight over 150lbs and other minor bugs we found on supported versions)
    • Tablet version: We will adapt our app so that it can also be used on android tablets
    • “Neutral mode/All info mode”: We will add a new mode that is completely neutral to your purposes with the app, that way you can view all the information without Mcalc asking if you are looking to get pregnant or if you are just having sex for fun ( This way we become more inclusive with the Asexual community and every person who just wants to keep a track on their period)
    • iOS VERSION!!!!!!!: DUE TO THE HIGH DEMAND WE WILL LAUNCH (in the next couple of days) AN INDIEGOGO CAMPAIGN TO FINANCE THE iOS VERSION, PLEASE STAY TUNED AND FOLLOW SEXMIND ON TUMBLR SO THAT YOU CAN SUPPORT OUR PROJECT AND HELP US SIGNAL BOOST TO MAKE THIS A REALITY FOR iOS PHONES.

    we will make all further announcements through our main tumblr, so please follow back if you are interested.

    sexmind.tumblr.com

  3. Tumblr, I need your help.

    agent-odd:

    My mother is extremely unaccepting. I am a female-to-male transgender, and she blatantly refuses to allow me any room to be myself. She pushes girly things on me, tells me she’ll never let me dress the way I want, and so on, and so forth.

    If you think that I should be allowed to be who I am, please reblog this.

  4. queerpositive:

    buttscuiteer:

    raverjesus:

    loveyourrebellion:

    D.C. Launches First Ever Transgender Respect Ad Campaign

    Yes, good.

    I will respect these posters forever because they put a genderfluid/genderqueer/whatever person. That is normally so overlooked.

    This campaign has a lot of awesome stuff going for it.

    1) Transgender PoC make up about half the face of the campaign.

    2) There is a genderqueer person (!!) and their caption respectfully uses “person” instead of man or woman.

    3) Plus-sized trans* people for the win!

    4) Finally a campaign explicitly for trans* people that emphasizes our deserving respect and courtesy.

    5) The transgender women and men are included in “any woman/man” which is huge because it emphasizes that trans* women and men are women and men too; it leaves no room for argument and doesn’t turn it into a debate about genitals.

    6) Emphasis on our being a part of the communities we live in. We aren’t any different than anyone else.

    I really love the DC Transgender Respect campaign and I wish more states and cities would launch stuff like this!

    - Jax

  5. retro-sci-fi-songbird:

    Son’s gender change inspires Thomas Dolby song

    Ooh, gonna have to fire up TunnelBear and watch that.

    There was an article I read about Harper earlier this year that got me SO annoyed… He declined to state whether he’d had top or bottom surgery, which is absolutely his right. And then the next two paragraphs were Kathleen talking about trying to come to terms with [the surgery he had]. And while yes, including his parents’ reaction to the process was an important part of the article, that just struck me as being totally fucking insensitive and disrespectful.

    It is fascinating to see TMDR get more comfortable with it as the years go by, though.  He blogged about “Simone” - three years ago this week, as it happens - and only referred to “someone I’m close to.”  I’m so glad, for all their sakes, that Harper’s parents are so openly supportive of him now.

  6. thebetterbrotherloki:

volatile-self-obsessed:

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Ally Tips
Graphic from Trinity’s Q Soc (of Ireland)
Following text from UC Davis’ Trans* Ally Tips Page
Trans Ally Tips

SOME WAYS TO BE A GOOD TRANS ALLY…
Don’t ever out a transperson. This is dangerous to their safety & can invalidate their identity.  Likewise, be aware of your surroundings when discussing trans issues with a transperson. For their safety & comfort, they may prefer not to discuss these topics in public places or among strangers.
Always use the pronouns & name the person wants you to use. If you’re unsure, ASK!  If you make a mistake, correct yourself, & politely (& subtly, if possible) correct others if they use the wrong pronoun.
Ask when & where it’s safe to use their chosen name & pronouns (e.g., if a transperson is not out at home, ask them how you should refer to them around their family, etc). Don’t ask transpeople what their “real” name is (i.e., the one they were born with).  If you know their birth name, do not divulge it to others.  
Instead of using prefixes like bio- or real- to designate that someone is not trans, use “non-trans” or the prefix “cis-”. Two reasons for this: one, using “real” or “bio” sets up a dichotomy in which transpeople are not considered “real” or “biological.”  Two, using the terms trans & non-trans or cis- alters the framework so that transpeople are the default rather than the Other.  Setting up trans as the norm can help make transphobia & gender privilege more obvious.
Instead of saying someone was born a boy (or a girl), try saying they were assigned male at birth (or were female-assigned).  These terms recognize the difference between sex & gender, and emphasize the ways in which sex & gender are assigned to individuals at birth, rather than being innate, binary or immutable qualities.
Don’t confuse gender with sexual preference.  Transpeople, like non-trans people, are straight, gay, bisexual, pansexual, asexual, etc.  Gender is not tied to sexual preference, & there are a million ways to express desire.
Don’t fetishize.  Transpeople’s bodies are not a public forum. “Creatures with cunts,” “the best of both worlds” & “chicks with dicks” are all inappropriate ways of describing transpeople’s bodies.
Don’t ask transpeople about their bodies, how they have sex, what their genitals are like, etc.  It’s rude & none of your business.  It can help to think about whether you would ask these questions of a non-trans person.
Don’t ask about surgery or hormone status; don’t ask “when are you going to have the surgery?” or “are you on hormones?” Like non-trans people, our medical histories & bodies can be intensely personal & private.  If transpeople want to share these details with you, allow them to do so on their own terms.
Don’t assume the only way to transition is through hormones/surgery, & understand that medical transition is very often based on economic status.  Recognize the classism inherent in associating medical transition with “authentic” trans identities.
Don’t assume all transpeople want hormones and/or surgery, or to transition at all.
Don’t assume all transpeople feel “trapped in the wrong body.” This is an oversimplification and not the way (all) transpeople feel.
Don’t assume all transpeople identify as “men” or “women.”  Many transpeople and genderqueer people identify as both, neither, or something altogether different.
Don’t tell transpeople what is appropriate to their gender (e.g., transwomen should grow their hair out & wear dresses).  Like non-trans people, we have varying forms of gender expression.
Recognize the diversity of trans & genderqueer lives. Remember that these identities are part of other identities, and intersect with race, class, sexual preference, age, etc.
Do listen if a transperson chooses to talk to you about their gender identity.  Be honest about things you don’t understand—don’t try to fake it!
Be aware of places transpeople may not be able to go (pun intended). Be understanding if a transperson doesn’t feel safe using a gendered bathroom or locker room. If your organization is holding an event, designate a gender-neutral bathroom in the building.
Recognize that not all transpeople or genderqueer folks are out there trying to smash the gender binary. Recognize that it’s not their responsibility. If you want to smash the gender binary, then you do it!
Don’t ask transpeople to educate you.  Do your own homework & research.  Understand that there is a difference between talking to individuals about their preferences/perspectives and forcing someone to be your educator.  Try not to view individuals as spokespeople; the trans communities are diverse, not one monolithic voice or viewpoint.
Don’t assume transmen are exempt from male privilege, misogyny, sexism, etc, just because of a so-called “girl past.”
Recognize that transwomen deal with sexism in a very real way (on top of transphobia).
Recognize that transwomen deserve access to “women-only” spaces/programs/shelters/etc.
Recognize your privilege & prejudices as a normatively gendered person.Think about what makes you uncomfortable & why.
Don’t let transphobia slide.  Confront it as you would confront all other forms of oppression. Trans issues are rarely discussed & when they are it is often in a negative light. Transphobia is equally oppressive as (& works in conjunction with) sexism, homophobia, racism, classism, etc.
Talk about trans issues/rights.  Engage people in discussions & share your knowledge. The majority of “information” people have about trans issues is based on stereotypes & assumptions.  To most people, trans folks are the freaks from Jerry Springer.
Be aware of the vital role you play as a non-trans person. Remember that the way you talk about transpeople (e.g., using the right pronouns) influences how others perceive us & can make a difference in whether we pass, & whether we feel safe/comfortable. Always remember that people may be more likely to listen to & take cues from non-trans people than from transpeople.  What you say & do matters!
Don’t just mourn or take action when transpeople are murdered.  Celebrate trans lives & work at making trans & genderqueer issues more visible on a day-to-day basis.
Don’t tokenize.  Simply adding the “T” to LGB doesn’t make you or your organization hip, progressive, or an ally.  Make sure you have the resources, information & understanding to deserve that T.
Above all respect and support transpeople in their lives & choices.


Read this. Share this.It really means so much. <3 ))

//I myself am Transgender and I support this! -shares with love-

    thebetterbrotherloki:

    volatile-self-obsessed:

    knowhomo:

    LGBTQ* Ally Tips

    Graphic from Trinity’s Q Soc (of Ireland)

    Following text from UC Davis’ Trans* Ally Tips Page

    Trans Ally Tips

    SOME WAYS TO BE A GOOD TRANS ALLY…

    • Don’t ever out a transperson. This is dangerous to their safety & can invalidate their identity.  Likewise, be aware of your surroundings when discussing trans issues with a transperson. For their safety & comfort, they may prefer not to discuss these topics in public places or among strangers.
    • Always use the pronouns & name the person wants you to use. If you’re unsure, ASK!  If you make a mistake, correct yourself, & politely (& subtly, if possible) correct others if they use the wrong pronoun.
    • Ask when & where it’s safe to use their chosen name & pronouns (e.g., if a transperson is not out at home, ask them how you should refer to them around their family, etc). Don’t ask transpeople what their “real” name is (i.e., the one they were born with).  If you know their birth name, do not divulge it to others. 
    • Instead of using prefixes like bio- or real- to designate that someone is not trans, use “non-trans” or the prefix “cis-”. Two reasons for this: one, using “real” or “bio” sets up a dichotomy in which transpeople are not considered “real” or “biological.”  Two, using the terms trans & non-trans or cis- alters the framework so that transpeople are the default rather than the Other.  Setting up trans as the norm can help make transphobia & gender privilege more obvious.
    • Instead of saying someone was born a boy (or a girl), try saying they were assigned male at birth (or were female-assigned).  These terms recognize the difference between sex & gender, and emphasize the ways in which sex & gender are assigned to individuals at birth, rather than being innate, binary or immutable qualities.
    • Don’t confuse gender with sexual preference.  Transpeople, like non-trans people, are straight, gay, bisexual, pansexual, asexual, etc.  Gender is not tied to sexual preference, & there are a million ways to express desire.
    • Don’t fetishize.  Transpeople’s bodies are not a public forum. “Creatures with cunts,” “the best of both worlds” & “chicks with dicks” are all inappropriate ways of describing transpeople’s bodies.
    • Don’t ask transpeople about their bodies, how they have sex, what their genitals are like, etc.  It’s rude & none of your business.  It can help to think about whether you would ask these questions of a non-trans person.
    • Don’t ask about surgery or hormone status; don’t ask “when are you going to have the surgery?” or “are you on hormones?” Like non-trans people, our medical histories & bodies can be intensely personal & private.  If transpeople want to share these details with you, allow them to do so on their own terms.
    • Don’t assume the only way to transition is through hormones/surgery, & understand that medical transition is very often based on economic status.  Recognize the classism inherent in associating medical transition with “authentic” trans identities.
    • Don’t assume all transpeople want hormones and/or surgery, or to transition at all.
    • Don’t assume all transpeople feel “trapped in the wrong body.” This is an oversimplification and not the way (all) transpeople feel.
    • Don’t assume all transpeople identify as “men” or “women.”  Many transpeople and genderqueer people identify as both, neither, or something altogether different.
    • Don’t tell transpeople what is appropriate to their gender (e.g., transwomen should grow their hair out & wear dresses).  Like non-trans people, we have varying forms of gender expression.
    • Recognize the diversity of trans & genderqueer lives. Remember that these identities are part of other identities, and intersect with race, class, sexual preference, age, etc.
    • Do listen if a transperson chooses to talk to you about their gender identity.  Be honest about things you don’t understand—don’t try to fake it!
    • Be aware of places transpeople may not be able to go (pun intended). Be understanding if a transperson doesn’t feel safe using a gendered bathroom or locker room. If your organization is holding an event, designate a gender-neutral bathroom in the building.
    • Recognize that not all transpeople or genderqueer folks are out there trying to smash the gender binary. Recognize that it’s not their responsibility. If you want to smash the gender binary, then you do it!
    • Don’t ask transpeople to educate you.  Do your own homework & research.  Understand that there is a difference between talking to individuals about their preferences/perspectives and forcing someone to be your educator.  Try not to view individuals as spokespeople; the trans communities are diverse, not one monolithic voice or viewpoint.
    • Don’t assume transmen are exempt from male privilege, misogyny, sexism, etc, just because of a so-called “girl past.”
    • Recognize that transwomen deal with sexism in a very real way (on top of transphobia).
    • Recognize that transwomen deserve access to “women-only” spaces/programs/shelters/etc.
    • Recognize your privilege & prejudices as a normatively gendered person.
      Think about what makes you uncomfortable & why.
    • Don’t let transphobia slide.  Confront it as you would confront all other forms of oppression. Trans issues are rarely discussed & when they are it is often in a negative light. Transphobia is equally oppressive as (& works in conjunction with) sexism, homophobia, racism, classism, etc.
    • Talk about trans issues/rights.  Engage people in discussions & share your knowledge. The majority of “information” people have about trans issues is based on stereotypes & assumptions.  To most people, trans folks are the freaks from Jerry Springer.
    • Be aware of the vital role you play as a non-trans person. Remember that the way you talk about transpeople (e.g., using the right pronouns) influences how others perceive us & can make a difference in whether we pass, & whether we feel safe/comfortable. Always remember that people may be more likely to listen to & take cues from non-trans people than from transpeople.  What you say & do matters!
    • Don’t just mourn or take action when transpeople are murdered.  Celebrate trans lives & work at making trans & genderqueer issues more visible on a day-to-day basis.
    • Don’t tokenize.  Simply adding the “T” to LGB doesn’t make you or your organization hip, progressive, or an ally.  Make sure you have the resources, information & understanding to deserve that T.
    • Above all respect and support transpeople in their lives & choices.

    Read this. Share this.
    It really means so much. <3 ))

    //I myself am Transgender and I support this! -shares with love-

  7. I need help.

    alldolleddown:

    jimmympregurine:

    shurlockk:

    For nearly five years, I’ve identified myself as a male. I’m 17 years old now.

    Today, I spent the entire day looking at binders for my chest. I’ve decided that I want the cheapest one I can find because that’s all I thought my parents would be willing to buy me - and that’s fine. (it’s 30$)

    I tried to talk to my mom about buying one for me, but she refused to discuss it with me. We were walking out of our driveway to go for a walk, and since my dad wasn’t there, I thought it would be a good time to discuss it. I asked her if we could talk about the binder I want, and she said that she didn’t want to talk about it right then. I asked her why and she didn’t answer. I asked her when we could talk about it because I am actually quite desperate at this point, and these are her words exactly: “Leave me alone!” I turned my ass around and went back into the house.

    She’s uncomfortable with me wanting to be male. She doesn’t understand it. I’ve applied for some free binders at two separate sites, but they have long waiting lists and I doubt I’ll get one by this September, when school begins. And I refuse to go back as a girl.

    I’ve used duct tape in the past, which hurt immensely. Last year for my birthday, my mom bought me a cheap ACE bandage to flatten my chest - it worked aesthetically, but it hurt my back so badly that I had to lay down in the nurse’s office.

    What I’m asking for is a free binder from one of you guys. I have no where else to turn to, and I’m really upset right now. If someone is willing to donate one to me, I’d be very thankful.

    I’m just tired of this fucking body and no one seems to understand that.

    If anyone can help him out guys

    Boosting ♥

    [TW potentially triggering discussion if dysmorphic]

    When/if I bind, I use a bandeau bra. I think I bought it at Dots for ~$3 (could probably find something similar at Walmart), it’s relatively plain, and very comfortable. One bra brings my 42D down to ~B, and another layer brings them down more. It’s not the best option, but it is a quick (and cheap) fix.

About me

Kirsten. Forty-something. Fat. Married.
Queer, kinky, poly.
Not exactly sure what I'm doing here - but as near as I can figure, neither can anyone else. :-P

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